Pamela Youde hospital (Hong Kong) surgeons cut part of man’s lung by mistake





Pamela Youde hospital surgeons cut part of man’s lung by mistake

The Secretary for Food and Health, Dr Ko Wing-man, today expressed grave concern following a surgical blunder at Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital in Chai Wan where a part of a patient’s lung was removed as a result of an inaccurate diagnosis for cancer.


Hospital authorities explained that a lung specimen of a 64-year-old male tuberculosis patient had been contaminated with that of another patient. 

The blunder led to an unnecessary surgery to remove a lung lobe of the patient earlier this month.

Dr Ko has instructed the Hospital Authority to critically review the incident and investigate.

HA East Cluster Chief Executive Dr Lau Chor-chiu apologized today.

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Youth held for Yau Ma Tei sex worker killing

A 20-year-old male was arrested in Kwun Tong for the murder of a sex worker in her one-woman brothel on Reclamation Street in Yau Ma Tei early today. 

The 45-year-old sex worker was found unconscious with more than 20 knife wounds, police said. She was pronounced dead at 4:18 am at Kwong Wah Hospital.

Police listed the case as murder. A blood-stained knife has been recovered.

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HKU says police to investigate disrupted meeting; union plans governance vote

The Students’ Union of the University of Hong Kong is planning a referendum early next year on proposed changes to the governance structure. 

Union head Billy Fung, said it will study the governance structure of overseas universities before making a final proposal. 

There are suggestions that the law which automatically names the Chief Executive as the chancellor of universities in Hong Kong should be amended, to prevent government interference. 

Addressing new students at an inauguration ceremony, Fung said the university is “losing her glory" – and encouraged students to protect academic freedom and autonomy. 

Fung said it had been an eventful year – pointing to Chief Executive, Leung Chun-ying’s criticism of the Undergrad magazine in his Policy Address and the delay in appointing a new pro-vice-chancellor.
Meanwhile, University President Peter Mathieson said the HKU council had agreed that the interruption of the July 28 council meeting by students should be investigated by police. 
“We want to ensure that the investigation is fair and transparent. And, the university does not have the resources to investigate criminal activity,” he explained. 

But Billy Fung said he was confident that students had not committed any criminal act. He said most people outside the meeting venue were students, but there were ‘outsiders' too.—RTHK

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Helper arrested after baby’s death


Police have arrested a woman on suspicion of killing a baby boy in a flat in Quarry Bay. 

It is understood that the suspect is a foreign domestic helper. 
Police said they received a report from the helper's employer in the morning, saying the infant had become unconscious. He was certified dead at the scene.—RTHK

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Young cop admits deceiving colleagues for HK$130,000 cash and fraud


A police sergeant who was charged by the Independent 
Commission Against Corruption, admitted at the Eastern Magistracy today that he had solicited and accepted unauthorized loans and deceived money amounting to about HK$130,000 from six constables.

Yau Chun-kit, 40, pleaded guilty to nine charges of accepting an advantage, and two of soliciting an advantage, the ICAC said.

He further admitted one count of fraud.

Deputy Magistrate Winston Leung Wing-chung remanded the defendant in custody of the Correctional Services Department until September 7 this year for sentence, pending a background report.

The case arose from a corruption complaint referred by the Police. Subsequent ICAC enquiries revealed the above offences.

The court heard that Yau was a sergeant posted to various formations. In November 2012, he was posted to the Police Tactical Unit of Hong Kong Region. He was transferred to a Patrol Sub-unit of Central District in August 2013, and was attached to a District Investigation Team of Central District in March 2014.

In November 2012, Yau called a PTU constable to ask for a loan of HK$60,000 by falsely representing that his elder sister needed money urgently for chemotherapy treatment to cure her cancer. As the constable was unable to raise the money, the defendant suggested that the constable obtain a loan from a bank. Believing that the defendant had a genuine need of money, the constable took a loan of HK$60,000 from the bank, and lent the money to him.

After receiving the money in December 2012, Yau used about HK$40,000 to buy a camera and make repayments to a woman and a bank, and transferred another HK$15,000 to his account with the Hong Kong Jockey Club for placing bets on football matches. He kept the remaining balance in his bank account, but had never paid any money to his elder sister for the chemotherapy treatment.

Between May and August 2013, Yau, without authorization, accepted seven loans totalling HK$58,100 from two constables and a woman constable attached to the PSU of Central District, and a constable posted to a Special Duty Squad of Western District.

He was the immediate superviser of the three constables attached to the PSU of Central District, while the constable posted to the SDS of Western District obtained a loan from the Hong Kong Police Credit Union and lent it to Yau.

Yau also solicited two loans of HK$11,000 from one of the constables in the PSU of Central District and another constable under his immediate supervision in the DIT of Central District in August 2013 and March 2014 respectively. The solicitations were turned down by the constables concerned, the court was told.

The prosecution was represented by prosecuting counsel Diana Cheung, assisted by ICAC officer Kelvin Choi.
   
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HK-Chile investment pact in the works


Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development, Gregory So Kam-leung told the Chilean business community yesterday that Chile and Hong Kong are negotiating a more comprehensive agreement on investment promotion and protection under the free trade agreement signed last year.
“I look forward to an early and successful conclusion of the agreement, which would certainly add further impetus to our bilateral investments,’’ he told a luncheon organized by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council in Santiago, Chile.

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HK domestic exports picture gets uglier


Hong Kong's exports and imports fell by 1.6 percent and 5.2 percent respectively in July, the Government said today.
Exports of goods (including re-exports and domestic exports) fell by 1.6 percent over a year earlier to HK$320.9 billion, after a year-on-year drop of 3.1 percent in June.

Re-exports dropped by 1.3 percent to HK$316.7 billion in July, while domestic exports fell by 19 percent to HK$4.1 billion. 

Imports of goods fell by 5.2 percent over a year earlier to HK$349.3 billion in July, after a year-on-year drop of 2 percent in June. 

The trade deficit was HK$28.4 billion, equivalent to 8.1 percent of the value of goods imports.

For the first seven months, exports of goods dropped by 0.2 percent over the same period in 2014. The value of re-exports was virtually unchanged, while domestic exports shrank by 14 percent. Imports shrank by 1.6 percent. 

The trade deficit was HK$270.7 billion in the first seven months of 2015.

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HK-Chile investment pact in the works

Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development, Gregory So Kam-leung told the Chilean business community yesterday that Chile and Hong Kong are negotiating a more comprehensive agreement on investment promotion and protection under the free trade agreement signed last year.
“I look forward to an early and successful conclusion of the agreement, which would certainly add further impetus to our bilateral investments,’’ he told a luncheon organized by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council in Santiago, Chile.

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Company exec admits bogus test reports for gutter oil exporter

A company executive has admitted in the District Court to helping a trading company export lard oil that had not been inspected to Taiwan in the “gutter oil” scandal last September. 

So Tat-wai, a director of the surveyors Eagle View, followed the instruction of the trading company Globalway Corporation, and issued false certificates and reports claiming that the oil was suitable for humans when in fact the products were never tested.

The court was told that So had been paid between HK$500 and HK$700 for each false report, whereas each test cost up to HK$6,000. 

So pleaded guilty to one count of “conspiracy to make false instruments.’’ Sentencing was adjourned to September 15 and he was released on bail.

The lard was shipped to Taiwanese firm Chang Guann which was found to have sold cooking oil tainted with the so-called “gutter oil" – residual oil collected from grease traps and fryers, as well as recycled grease from leather processing plants. Some of the products were sold in Hong Kong.—RTHK

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John Tsang cautions punters, but assures market stability

Financial Secretary John Tsang Chun-wah told investors to take note of the severe financial market volatility and not to take unnecessary risks, while assuring investors that Hong Kong can withstand the turmoil.

“In light of the market volatility, investors must be especially aware of the risk and invest within their means. As an international financial center, Hong Kong's system is robust and our financial infrastructure is well equipped to meet the challenges during severe market fluctuations,’’ he said. 

“The Government and our regulatory agencies will continue to keep a close watch on the global and local markets and ensure that our market continues to operate smoothly.’’

He noted that since April this year, blue chips have fallen by 25 per cent from a high of 28,443 points. 

“Hong Kong is an externally oriented market and has always been subject to the impacts of foreign financial markets and the fast-changing external environments. In spite of the major fluctuations, most importantly, the local market traded and operated in an orderly and smooth fashion, and the currency and interest rate markets remain stable. We have not seen substantial outflow of funds from Hong Kong, and our banking system has no liquidity issue.’’
Pamela Youde hospital (Hong Kong) surgeons cut part of man’s lung by mistake Pamela Youde hospital (Hong Kong) surgeons cut part of man’s lung by mistake Reviewed by Ajit Kumar on 8:05 AM Rating: 5

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