American Novelist E.L. Doctorow, Author of Ragtime, Dies at 84



American Novelist E.L. Doctorow, Author of 

Ragtime, Dies at 84

American novelist E.L. Doctorow, author of such tomes as Ragtime, Billy Bathgate, and The March, has died in New York at age 84.

The writer's son Richard Doctorow told reporters his father died Tuesday of complications from lung cancer.
Doctorow was characterized by President Barack Obama as "one of America's great novelists." The president said in a Twitter message Tuesday that he learned much from Doctorow's books -- mixtures of history and fiction, tales unspooled in a variety of experimental narrative styles.
Doctorow is said to have covered more than a century of American history in his 10 novels and two short story collections. He also authored a play called Drinks Before Dinner and numerous essays and articles.
Born in New York City in 1931, Doctorow's grandparents were Jewish immigrants from Russia. He had said that his location in New York City exposed him to the unique cultural offerings of Manhattan as well as those of European émigrés who fled persecution in Europe during the years leading up to World War II. Manhattan plays a prominent role in many of his novels, and he kept a home in the city until his death.
Doctorow's works won a series of top U.S. prizes for fiction -- the National Book Award for World's Fair, the National Book Critics Circle award and the PEN/Faulkner award for Billy Bathgate and The March.  His novel Ragtime was made into an Oscar-nominated movie and later into a Broadway musical that won four Tony Awards.
Doctorow was also the recipient of several lifetime achievement awards, among them the 2014 Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction. He is considered one of the most prominent American authors of the 20th century.


American Novelist E.L. Doctorow, Author of Ragtime, Dies at 84 American Novelist E.L. Doctorow, Author of   Ragtime, Dies at 84 Reviewed by Ajit Kumar on 10:58 AM Rating: 5

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