Speech by the President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee at the 58th Session of the All India Ayurvedic Congress in Chandigarh


The President, Shri Pranab Mukherjee inaugurating the 58th Plenary Session of All India Ayurvedic Congress, at Chandigarh, in Punjab on March 14, 2015. The Governor of Punjab and Haryana and Administrator UT of Chandigarh, Shri Kaptan Singh Solanki and the Minister of State for AAYUSH (Independent Charge) and Health & Family Welfare, Shri Shripad Yesso Naik are also seen.
Speech by the President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee at the 58th Session of the All India Ayurvedic Congress in Chandigarh



1. It is indeed a privilege to address this distinguished assembly of Vaidyas and practitioners of Ayurveda. I would like to, first of all, congratulate the All India Ayurveda Mahasammelan and Vidyapeeth for organising this 58th All India Convention on Ayurveda and providing an important forum for the experts in this field to exchange views, deliberate on the modern application of this ancient science and collectively address the task of promoting its use.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

2. Ayurveda, as a science, belongs to India. It is the oldest surviving system of medicine in the world. Its origins have been traced back more than 5000 years. It is believed that the concepts of Ayurveda were known to the people of the Indus Valley Civilization. The science was significantly developed during the Vedic period of our history. In fact, the main source of knowledge in this field are the Vedas – particularly the Atharvaveda believed to have been written around 1000 B.C. We know that in the 5th Century the erudite treatises of the greatest of our Vaidyas, Sushrutha and Charaka were translated from Sanskrit into Chinese and in 700 A.D. Chinese scholars were studying medicine in India at the University of Nalanda. By the 8th Century, these texts were translated into Arabic and Persian. We see that Arabic works derived from our Ayurvedic texts reached Europe by the 12th Century. Today, it is a matter of satisfaction that Ayurveda has not only sustained itself in many of the countries of South Asia, but is also popular across the seas in some of the countries of Europe and in the United States of America.

3. In India, most of us consciously - or as a matter of traditional practice - are relying on Ayurveda in our daily lives. Even those of us who are not formally trained in Ayurveda have embraced its principles in our dietary preferences and day to day routine. In all the diverse cultures of the different regions of India, herbs, spices, plants, leaves, flowers and oils, in countless combinations are prepared by households and administered as preventive supplements or medicinal remedies for addressing ailments - big and small. There is, for example, a specific reason for turmeric to be a key ingredient in our everyday food; the tulsi leaf is, similarly, incorporated in the holy water or charan amrit consumed after daily prayers and ghee made of cow’s milk has been a staple cooking medium down the ages. Due to the simple nature of the ingredients in Ayurvedic remedies, many of us prefer to rely upon Ayurveda to avoid the harmful side effects of modern medicine.


Distinguished participants.

4. It is unfortunate that Ayurveda, as a science, had been suppressed for a long period when India was under colonial rule - due to which training and education in this ancient science suffered.

5. Fortunately, in post-Independence India, both our Central and State Governments have taken a number of steps to revive this invaluable treasure of ancient medicinal secrets. Government of India has, today, a full-fledged Ministry of AYUSH for the development and promotion of Ayurveda, Yoga & Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy. This Ministry has been working with the practitioners of our indigenous medicinal systems to develop and strengthen education and training in these sciences. The Sushruta Samhita and Charaka Samhita are now available to students in Hindi and English. I am confident that such efforts will significantly encourage the development of Ayurveda in our country and abroad.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

6. I would like to emphasise that Ayurveda should not be regarded as merely a system of healthcare: it is, rather, a set of disciplines that work together to create balance and harmony within us. It is based on the perception that life represents a relationship between the atma or soul, mana or mind, indriya or senses and sarira or body. It is a unique combination of science and philosophy for balancing the body’s physical, mental, emotional and spiritual components. Ayurvedic doctors believe that this equilibrium is necessary for good health. Creating such a balance helps to heal the sick, to maintain the health of those who are well, and to prevent disease and promote quality of life.

7. For too long has Ayurveda been dismissed as an ‘unproven’ discipline. I would like to see Ayurvedic medicine being demystified and popularized through informative marketing and user friendly packaging; I would like to see the day when we have mobile clinics delivering Ayurvedic treatment and medicine through the villages in all parts of India. I would particularly like to encourage the youth of India to study, safeguard, practice and propagate this ancient knowledge system.

8. It is believe that centuries ago, the medicinal systems of Ayurveda and Siddha had laid down protocols for successfully treating diseases that resembled the diseases that we know today as HIV and tuberculosis. If these remedies could be researched and the findings pursued, they could bring new hope to millions and revolutionize modern medicine. To achieve this, I would like to see greater collaboration between ayurvedic and allopathic researchers to widen the database of treatment protocols and successful medical practices for the benefit of our people. It would also be appropriate to establish channels of direct connectivity between Ayurvedic laboratories and drug manufacturers. Some modern hospitals are additionally offering Ayurveda in the name of integrative medicine. I would definitely encourage hospitals all over India to add the facility and service of Ayurvedic treatment in whichever way they can. In the same context, the importance of Yoga has been acknowledged for protecting health and curing disease. This year, the United Nations adopted without a vote, a resolution, declaring June 21st as International Day of Yoga, recognizing that “Yoga provides a holistic approach to health and well being”. As Yoga and Ayurveda are complimentary to each other - and the practice of Yoga can increase the beneficial effects of Ayurveda – a combination of yoga and ayurveda can go a long way in giving good health and preventing disease.

9. I am confident that the deliberations at this 58th Convention will serve to give a new impetus to the awareness and practice of Ayurveda and enhance its relevance in our contemporary society by simplifying and popularizing it through modern scientific interventions.

10. With these words, I once again congratulate the organizers of this conference and convey to them my best wishes for its success.

Thank you!

Jai Hind!


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Demystify and popularise Ayurvedic medicine, for too long has Ayurveda been dismissed as an 'unproven' discipline, says President

The President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee inaugurated the 58th Session of the All India Ayurvedic Congress at Chandigarh today (March 14, 2015).

Speaking on the occasion the President said Ayurveda should not be regarded as merely a system of healthcare. It is, rather, a set of disciplines that work together to create balance and harmony within us. It is based on the perception that life represents a relationship between the atma or soul, mana or mind, indriya or senses and sarira or body. It is a unique combination of science and philosophy for balancing the body’s physical, mental, emotional and spiritual components. Ayurveda doctors believe that this equilibrium is necessary for good health. Creating such a balance helps to heal the sick, maintain the health of those who are well, prevent disease and promote quality of life.

The President said in India, most of us consciously - or as a matter of traditional practice - are relying on Ayurveda in our daily lives. Even those of us who are not formally trained in Ayurveda have embraced its principles in our dietary preferences and day to day routine. In all the diverse cultures of the different regions of India, herbs, spices, plants, leaves, flowers and oils, in countless combinations are prepared by households and administered as preventive supplements or medicinal remedies for addressing ailments - big and small. There is, for example, a specific reason for turmeric to be a key ingredient in our everyday food; the tulsi leaf is, similarly, incorporated in the holy water or charan amrit consumed after daily prayers and ghee made of cow’s milk has been a staple cooking medium down the ages. Due to the simple nature of the ingredients in Ayurvedic remedies, many of us prefer to rely upon Ayurveda to avoid the harmful side effects of modern medicine.

The President said it is unfortunate that Ayurveda, as a science, had been suppressed for a long period when India was under colonial rule - due to which training and education in this ancient science suffered. For too long has Ayurveda been dismissed as an ‘unproven’ discipline. Ayurvedic medicone should be demystified and popularized through marketing and user friendly packaging. Mobile clinics should deliver Ayurvedic treatment and medicine in villages across India. The President encouraged the youth of India to study, safeguard, practice and propagate this ancient knowledge system.

The President said it is believed that centuries ago, the medicinal systems of Ayurveda and Siddha had laid down protocols for successfully treating diseases that resembled the diseases that we know today as HIV and tuberculosis. If these remedies could be researched and the findings pursued, they could bring new hope to millions and revolutionize modern medicine. He called for greater collaboration between ayurvedic and allopathic researchers to widen the database of treatment protocols and successful medical practices for the benefit of people. He also called for channels of direct connectivity to be established between Ayurvedic laboratories and drug manufacturers. He encouraged hospitals all over India to add the facility and service of Ayurvedic treatment in whichever way they can.

The President expressed the hope that deliberations at the 58th Convention will serve to give a new impetus to the awareness and practice of Ayurveda and enhance its relevance in contemporary society by simplifying and popularizing Ayurveda through modern scientific interventions.

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Speech by the President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee at the Sixty Fourth Convocation of Panjab University

1. I am happy to be here today and be a part of this Sixty Fourth Convocation of Panjab University, one of the country’s oldest and leading centres of higher education. At the outset, let me thank the University for inviting me and giving the opportunity to address this august gathering.

2. Panjab University has a long history dating back to the Nineteenth Century. It was established in 1882 at Lahore as the University of Punjab. In 1947 after India’s Independence, it was re-established at Shimla as the East Panjab University. Consequent to the re-organization of the State of Punjab in 1966, Panjab University with its main campus in Chandigarh acquired the status of an ‘inter-state body corporate’, which is unique for an educational institution in our country.

3. Panjab University is today a vibrant centre of higher learning. Its 78 Departments, four Chairs and four Regional Centres profess in the wide range of faculties from Arts to Science, Law, Management, Engineering, Medicine and Agriculture. With a long tradition of pursuing excellence in teaching and research, several departments of this prestigious University are covered by the University Grants Commission (UGC) and the Department of Science and Technology for special assistance and fund support. Two centres of excellence – one, on nano technology, and the other, on gender audit – were supported by the UGC during the Eleventh Plan period. With facilities for Stem Cell Research and Drug Development, Panjab University has also been recognized by the UGC as a “University with Potential for Excellence in Bio-medical Sciences". This University has research collaborations with leading research and technology institutions in India and abroad.

4. Panjab University has educated generations of students, many of whom have risen to occupy eminent positions in various walks of life. It counts amongst its distinguished alumni a former Prime Minister and such others including Nobel Laureate Late Dr. Har Gobind Khorana, leading figures in public life and civil servants. That this University has excelled in providing quality education has been recognized internationally. It is heartening to note that at the 276-300th bracket in the Times Higher Education Survey 2014-15, Panjab University is the highest-ranked Indian institution. I applaud you all for this achievement. I am confident that you will touch greater heights through the same spirit of dedication and commitment.

Dear graduating students:

5. Let me congratulate you on coming out successful and deserving of this joyous occasion in your life. I can see a palpable sense of delight in you. In this moment of glory, you must comprehend the hopes and expectations that your near and dear ones, the society and the nation at large have from you. India is a shining example of democratic polity and pluralistic society. Democracy not only gives rights but also entails responsibilities. Educated youth must play a vital role in building a resurgent new India. Your education has given you an opportunity to make a difference. This is the time to engage with our beautiful, complex, and sometimes noisy democracy.

6. Competent and committed individuals are necessary to build the country of our dreams. Our universities must produce men and women of character and integrity. Mahatma Gandhi had said and I quote: "Real education consists in drawing the best out of yourself. What better book can there be than the book of humanity? (unquote)" Bapu`s call to follow the book of humanity can resolve the dilemmas of today’s youth. I am confident that you will live your dream, and that of your country and countrymen.

Friends:

7. A country’s ascent is determined to a large extent by human capital. As such, education plays a decisive role in shaping the destiny of nations. At the apex of the education system is the university. Indian universities have potential to be the leading institutions in the world. For that, urgent improvements in academic management are needed. To make learning more effective, teaching pedagogy must be refined, curricula up-dated regularly, an inter-disciplinary approach adopted and evaluation mechanism reformed. To make faculty up-to-date in their field of knowledge, faculty recharge programmes must be conducted. To pursue excellence, core competencies must be identified and centres of excellence nurtured. To create quality consciousness, every institution must be benchmarked and accredited.

Friends:

8. There are four kinds of stakeholders with which a higher academic institution can gainfully leverage its linkages, to develop into a world-class institution:

o One, it can gain from interacting with other academic institutes in India and abroad through: exchange of faculty and students; participation in seminars and workshops; joint research papers; collaborative research; and sharing of academic resources like course material and resource persons. It would be worthwhile to make full use of the National Knowledge Network in these endeavours.

o Two, an industry interface can benefit in terms of: involvement of industry personnel in curriculum design and project guidance; sponsorship of chair positions; and setting up of incubation centres and laboratories. These could be facilitated through an industry-interface cell as well as by induction of industry experts in governance mechanisms.

o Three, an institute can reach out to its alumni who retains an emotional connect with their alma mater. Some of them could be associated for academic management through governing bodies; and for business and project mentoring and curriculum design.

o Four, a higher educational institution interacts with the society at large. As the persuasive power of a university extends beyond the classroom and teaching, it can act as a role-model to usher in socio-economic development. The central government has launched: (i) Swachh Bharat Mission, aimed at a Clean India by 2019; (ii) Digital India programme, to usher in a digitally-empowered knowledge society; and (iii) Saansad Adarsh Gram Yojana (SAGY), to create model villages through their holistic development. Our academic institutions must take active part in these initiatives. They should adopt at least five villages and leverage all academic and other resources to offer solutions to their problems and develop them as model villages.

Friends:

9. Higher educational institutions would do well to recognize emerging global trends that are creating new models of knowledge dispensation. Rising costs of higher education and changing profile of education seekers, aided by technology, has led to Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Due to its advantage of speed, scale and efficiency, it is fast catching up as the preferred mode of learning. Blended MOOCs - online instruction supplemented by periodic classroom interaction – also have the potential to gain ground. Choice-Based Credit System has been introduced that will provide students mobility across the higher educational system. Universities must note these evolutions in education and take steps to maximize benefits.

Friends:

10. Many innovative ideas are born out of the ingenuity of the common man. Mentoring them to validate ideas and design viable products calls for the development of an innovation value-chain. Higher learning institutions, due to their multiple linkages, can propel this eco-system. Many central institutions have started Innovation clubs to spur an innovation culture and translate ‘inclusion in innovation’ into a workable framework. Your University is a pioneer on many fronts. You, too, can open such a club and link some of the ingenious ideas of grassroots innovators in this region to innovation incubators in technical and research institutions.

11. A scientific temper, which takes one’s imagination beyond the realm of grades and classroom, is essential in our students. Our institutions must fire the power of imagination of their students. The teacher must encourage the taught to think beyond books, question concepts and accept a proposition only after investigation. Students must have a grand vision which they can, through research and inquiry, translate into reality.

12. With these words, I conclude. I once again compliment the graduating students and wish them a bright future ahead. I also wish the management and faculty of Panjab University the very best for the future.

Thank you.

Jai Hind.


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Universities must produce men and women of character and integrity, says President

The President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee addressed the Sixty Fourth Convocation of Punjab University, one of the country’s oldest and leading centres of higher education at Chandigarh today (March 14, 2015).

Speaking on the occasion the President said Punjab University has educated generations of students, many of whom have risen to occupy eminent positions in various walks of life.

The President congratulated the successful students and asked them to comprehend the hopes and expectations of their near and dear ones as well as of society and the nation at large. The President said India is a shining example of a democratic polity and pluralistic society. Democracy not only gives rights but also entails responsibilities. Educated youth must play a vital role in the building of a resurgent new India.

The President said competent and committed individuals are necessary to build the country of our dreams. Our universities must produce men and women of character and integrity. Mahatma Gandhi said: "Real education consists in drawing the best out of yourself. What better book can there be than the book of humanity?" Bapu`s call to follow the book of humanity can resolve the dilemmas of today’s society.

The President said a country’s ascent is determined to a large extent by human capital. As such, education plays a decisive role in shaping the destiny of nations. At the apex of the education system is the university. Indian universities have the potential to be leading institutions of the world. Higher educational institutions would do well to recognize emerging global trends that are creating new models of knowledge dispensation. Rising costs of higher education and changing profile of education seekers, aided by technology, has led to Massive Open Online Courses. Universities must note these evolutions in education and take steps to maximize benefits.

The President said many innovative ideas are born out of the ingenuity of the common man. Mentoring them to validate ideas and design viable products calls for the development of an innovation value-chain. Higher learning institutions due to their multiple linkages can propel this eco-system.

The President said a scientific temper, which takes one’s imagination beyond the realm of grades and classroom, is essential in our students. Our institutions must fire the power of imagination of their students. The teacher must encourage the taught to think beyond books, question concepts and accept a proposition only after investigation. Students must have a grand vision which they can, through research and inquiry, translate into reality.


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Indian Revenue Service probationers call on the President

A group of 182 IRS Probationers of 68th Batch of the Indian Revenue Service including two officers from Bhutan Government called on the President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee at Rashtrapati Bhavan yesterday (March 13, 2015).

Addressing the probationers, the President said he personally had a long association with the Department starting since early in 1970’s till 2012, before he joined the office of the President. He has watched the department growing over the years and its transformation as an organization integrating the role of an enforcement organization as well as an organization which cares for the tax payers by providing better quality of tax services.

President said that in 1860-61 direct tax collection was Rs. 30 lakh as compared to Rs. 7.98 lakh crores in the year 2015-16; which indicates the rising share of direct tax and also structural changes in the Indian economy.

The President called upon each of the officers to use their thoughts, imagination and ideas in the service of the country. He said the quality of public servants is most critical for any governance system. Good public policy is essential but its implementation is even more critical. Civil servants must have the required skill and knowledge as well as right values, which include integrity, spirit of public service and above all, a commitment to the ideals and philosophy embodied in the Constitution of India. The higher civil services in the country must be a role model. Bright young officers must rise to the occasion and live up to the faith and trust reposed in them.

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Vice president inaugurates international conference on ‘global environment issues’

The Vice President of India Shri M. Hamid Ansari has said that Environmental degradation and climate change are amongst the foremost challenges confronting human civilization in our times. The protection and preservation of environment and its sustainable management are essential for the survival of humanity and our planet, as we know it. Delivering inaugural address at the International Conference on ‘Global Environment Issues’ organised by the National Green Tribunal in association with the Ministry of Environment, Forests & Climate Change, Government of India here today, he said that Environment is a public good. It is not owned by any one individual. Human activities result in significant environmental changes that cause damage to species, ecosystems and ecological processes. Preservation of the integrity of these ecological components is critical, considering they provide the bio-physical base necessary for human life, such as water, land, air, forests, biodiversity.

He expressed his concern that the threat of climate change is a serious global concern. There is near consensus among scientists that climate change is unequivocal. Increase in anthropogenic activities has built up concentration of Greenhouse Gases in our atmosphere, leading to global warming. This in turn, could lead to changes in rainfall patterns, disruption in hydrological cycles, melting of ice caps and glaciers, rise in sea levels, and increase in frequency and intensity of extreme events such as heavy precipitation or cyclones. These developments can have a serious impact on sustainability of water resources, agriculture, forests and ecosystems, affecting the well-being of billions of people.

The Vice President opined that Sustainability of economic development crucially hinges on the protection of environment. For us in India, challenges of arresting the pace of degradation of environment are formidable due to the imperatives of maintaining high economic growth, increasing trends of urbanisation, population growth, industrialisation, unmet basic needs, life style changes and biotic pressures. We, therefore, need to pay greater attention to management of all natural resources through appropriate eco-friendly policies, regulatory frameworks, pricing of natural resources and making pollution costlier for the polluter.

He said that in India, protecting and improving the natural environment is a fundamental duty of every citizen as per the Constitution. Domestic policies have been tailored to take into account the environmental impact assessments. Institutions to implement and monitor these policies have been set up at the centre and state level. India has also been active in international forums relating to environmental protection, and is party to 94 multilaterals environmental agreements. However, much more needs to be done to translate commitments into action and results.

The Vice President said that Globally, India’s policy goal of achieving sustainable development and addressing emerging global environmental concerns, such as, climate change, ozone depletion and bio-dieversity loss, is guided by the principle of ‘common but differentiated responsibility’. India prefers an ‘aspirational’ rather than a mandatory or ‘prescriptive’ approach. We believe that the issue of sustainable development should be approached with a sense of equity; and the development aspirations of the developing countries should be built into the green economy principles being evolved at the international level. Whatever our respective national positions on these issues, the protection and preservation of environment is the common responsibility of all humanity. This calls for closer cooperation among nations and a holistic approach. Failure to do so would have serious consequences for our very survival as a species.

Following is the text of the Vice President’s inaugural address :

“I am happy to be here today for the inauguration of the International Conference on ‘Global Environmental Issues’ organised by the National Green Tribunal, in association with the Ministry of Environment, Forests & Climate Change, Government of India. The Conference brings together distinguished Judges, environmentalists, scientists, lawyers, experts and members of civil society from India and abroad to discuss important environmental issues. It has a comprehensive and relevant agenda before it. This gathering provides a useful platform to the participants for deliberating on important environmental issues, which are of global interest and concern. Better understanding of these issues and perhaps some solutions, preventive or remedial, to these challenges may emerge from the discussions during the course of the Conference.

Environmental degradation and climate change are amongst the foremost challenges confronting human civilization in our times. The protection and preservation of environment and its sustainable management are essential for the survival of humanity and our planet.

Environment is a public good. It is not owned by any one individual. Human activities result in significant environmental changes that cause damage to species, ecosystems and ecological processes. Preservation of the integrity of these ecological components is critical, considering they provide the bio-physical base necessary for human life, such as water, land, air, forests and biodiversity.

The impact of indiscriminate human action and insatiable consumption on the global environment has manifested itself, in what is widely accepted, as the phenomenon of climate change. This has been coupled with rapid depletion or pollution of natural resources.

The key environmental challenge that a developing country, such as India, faces relate to the nexus of environmental degradation with poverty in its many dimensions, and economic growth. It is thus important to understand the dichotomous relationship between economic growth and environmental degradation.

On the one hand, economic growth may result in “excessive” environmental degradation through use of natural resources and generation of pollution aggravated by institutional failures. On the other, economic growth permits improvement in environmental quality by making available the necessary resources for environmental investments, and generating societal pressures for improved environmental behaviour, and institutional and policy changes. The latter is most critical to its success

Unsustainable consumption patterns, particularly in industrialized countries also have serious adverse impacts on the environment, both local, and global. The global impacts are largely manifest in developing countries, and further aggravate poverty.

Environmental degradation is also a major causal factor in enhancing and perpetuating poverty, particularly among the rural poor and women, when such degradation impacts soil fertility, quantity and quality of water, air quality, forests, wildlife and fisheries.

Economic growth and development therefore have to be guided by the compulsion of sustainability, because we do not have the luxury of ignoring the economic as well as the environmental threats that a fast-deteriorating ecosystem poses to our fragile planet. It is said and well said that humans are the only species who destroy the environment.

Sustainability of economic development crucially hinges on the protection of environment. For us in India, challenges of arresting the pace of degradation of environment are formidable due to the imperatives of maintaining high economic growth, increasing trends of urbanisation, population growth, industrialisation, unmet basic needs, life style changes and biotic pressures.

We, therefore, need to pay greater attention to management of all natural resources through appropriate eco-friendly policies, regulatory frameworks, pricing of natural resources and making pollution costlier for the polluter.

The threat of climate change is a serious global concern. There is near consensus among scientists that climate change is unequivocal. Increase in anthropogenic activities has built up concentration of Greenhouse Gases in our atmosphere, leading to global warming. This in turn, could lead to changes in rainfall patterns, as is already happening, disruption in hydrological cycles, melting of ice caps and glaciers, rise in sea levels, and increase in frequency and intensity of extreme events such as heavy precipitation or cyclones. These developments can have a serious impact on sustainability of water resources, agriculture, forests and ecosystems, affecting the well-being of billions of people.

In India, protecting and improving the natural environment is a fundamental duty of every citizen as per the Constitution. Domestic policies have been tailored to take into account the environmental impact assessments. Institutions to implement and monitor these policies have been set up at the centre and state level. India has also been active in international forums relating to environmental protection, and is party to 94 multilaterals environmental agreements. However, much more needs to be done to translate commitments into action and results.

Globally, India’s policy goal of achieving sustainable development and addressing emerging global environmental concerns is guided by the principle of ‘common but differentiated responsibility’. India prefers an ‘aspirational’ rather than a mandatory or ‘prescriptive’ approach. We believe that the issue of sustainable development should be approached with a sense of equity; and the development aspirations of the developing countries should be built into the green economy principles being evolved at the international level.

Whatever our respective national positions on these issues, the protection and preservation of environment is the common responsibility of all humanity. This does calls for closer cooperation among nations and a holistic approach. Failure to do so would have serious consequences.

Environment is characterised by interconnectedness that transcends national/international boundaries. Hence, protection of environment and its management has to be a collective endeavour involving all stakeholders at global, regional and local levels.

Your gathering here is a manifestation of the human will and desire to come together and solve one of the critical problems confronting our planet. I wish you all success.

I thank Justice Swatanter Kumar for inviting me.”


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Speech by the President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee at the 58th Session of the All India Ayurvedic Congress in Chandigarh Speech by the President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee at the 58th Session of the All India Ayurvedic Congress in Chandigarh Reviewed by Ajit Kumar on 1:03 PM Rating: 5

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